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How to straigthen bent leader on fruit tree

How to straigthen bent leader on fruit tree



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How to straigthen bent leader on fruit tree..?

I've been reading that during the last year or two, greenhouse plants have been experiencing a lot of problems with their fruit because of 'bent leaders'. It seems that most growers are recommending that if you have a tree that appears to be crooked, cut the entire tree off at the root collar and try to straighten it out. This would also cut down a lot of regrowth and help create a better root system.

Is there a better way to bend a tree down? Other than letting it grow and see how it looks when you harvest, I'm wondering if there's some kind of tool you could use? Or should a bent leader actually be just a really short leader?

I had this tree, was forced to move and could only find out from a neighbor after having moved what caused the leader to bend. Anyway, no one around, but neighbor had told me that the tree should bend down with stressors present or near by, or put something heavy on the roots. This was what she told me.

While making sure of the facts, she also told me that one of the roots, that we all thought was bent, was actually very close to vertical. Now, I wasn't really paying attention but it was pointed out to me.

So my thinking is this.. if the tree is straight, then to put something heavy on it may actually not cause the tree to bend. So I'm wondering if there is a better way to bend trees down without using something like a fork to force it over?

I've heard that you can use a flat base and stand it on a tub full of water. They have a video showing it on a bowler plant. I'm not sure if this is correct, but seems like a good technique to try if you've had no luck bending the leader.

When our tree had big hips at the base the tree ended up bending when left on the garden beds for a long time. The reason it bent was that the roots were not compacted by the weight of the fruit. When we took the tree back to the greenhouse and harvested the fruit we cut the leader and put the tree back into the garden beds and spread the roots. We planted clover in the paths around the bases of the plants and over time we have seen the whole roots start to grow out again. The tree is now bent the other way (against the soil that we had the clover in) but it is growing and fruiting again. If you don't want to try the flat base method with your plant you can use a tub of water or there are other ways. I am not aware of any tools to help in bending trees.

You can find a lot of information about bending trees in our Q&,A forum. There are lots of trees bent on the forum, but, no one really knows how to "fix" them.

There is something similar to this that we did. When the tree had fruit, I left the fruit on the ground. We then bought a base of about the right size for the tree. This is more like putting a weight on the tree, but we couldn't find anything to put a weight on the tree.

When we got back to the greenhouse, we found the roots where starting to grow out and touch. I know this is not a perfect fix, but it is something.

The correct "fix" is to replace the suckers that run out from the crown. It's your responsibility to protect those suckers. You need to protect them from cutting off by leaving a broom around the trunk. It is also important to thin the suckers when you transplant. Remove all suckers until you find at least 1/4". You do not want to spend all your time in the greenhouse removing suckers. You do not want to give them time to grow to form a normal healthy root system.

Cut the leader, the cut should be just above where you see the major bends. Once you have removed the leader, plant in a container and set in the greenhouse. Start looking for healthy leaves with no deformity at the new tip.

If you planted the suckers in the ground, remove them first.

Are you growing only one cultivar? Try keeping your new trees in different conditions for a season. It is easy to detect a young disease-susceptible "grape" variety. You can see if they do better in an area that has heavy rain. If the tree is struggling, you will likely find it wanting in a dry summer. Make your plans now and don't plant these "grape" varieties in your garden.

I would tend to agree with Tom about leaning up a tree. There are many examples of this in other species. I don't think this will be a problem in my orchids, as you can always prune back the sucker shoots from the flower beds and if it is too much of a problem, remove the tree and prune down any suckers.

You can find a lot of information about bending trees in our Q&,A forum. There are lots of trees bent on the forum, but, no one really knows how to "fix" them.

There is something similar to this that we did. When the tree had fruit, I left the fruit on the ground. We then bought a base of about the right size for the tree. This is more like putting a weight on the tree, but we couldn't find anything to put a weight on the tree.

When we got back to the greenhouse, we found the roots where starting to grow out and touch. I know this is not a perfect fix, but it is something.

The correct "fix" is to replace the suckers that run out from the crown. It's your responsibility to protect those suckers. You need to protect them from cutting off by leaving a broom around the trunk. It is also important to thin the suckers when you transplant. Remove all suckers until you find at least 1/4". You do not want to spend all your time in the greenhouse removing suckers. You do not want to give them time to grow to form a normal healthy root system.


Watch the video: Sådan planter du frugt- og prydtræer